2019 School Funding 2 Getty
What Americans have said

What parents said: Are schools adequately funded?

In addition to the traditional PDK poll of Americans, PDK convened online focus groups with public school parents and public school teachers, thanks to funding support from the Carnegie Corporation of New York. These comments are drawn from those two groups.

They are not adequately funded. If they were, they would have smaller classrooms, more teachers/coaches, better facilities, and more adequate teaching tools. Larger schools would provide more space for students, more areas for expansion, and more room in general to educate. Less overcrowding/fewer students per teacher would allow students to get more focused education and also allow teachers to be less stressed.

Michael, 43, White father of three in suburban Texas

By legalizing things that are currently illegal, not only do states make more money, but it cuts back on crime. My honest opinion is that these issues will continue no Matter what. So by legalizing marijuana and gambling, states won’t have to waste valuable police resources, and, on top of that, we get extra money for schools. To me, it’s a win-win.

Brietta, 31, White mother of three in suburban Delaware

Using lotteries for educational funding is a great justifiable use of the taxes. Finally, a way to make gambling useful!

Kyle, 33, White father of a 1st grader in upstate New York suburb

If I could produce unlimited funding for my son's public schools, I would raise the public school teachers salaries by 50%. That would give teachers incentive to stay and to work hard for our children. It would also be incentive to get new teachers here. Our classrooms would have all of the day-to-day supplies (paper, pencils, pens, etc.) they need, and no child or family would have to pay for school supplies out their own pockets. School meals, breakfast, and lunches would be nutritionally better, more appetizing, and free. No more families would have to worry about qualifying for free or reduced meals for their kids.

Sandy, 54, White mother of one in urban Missouri

For the most part, schools are not adequately funded when a teacher must go in their pocket and pay for certain items in order for her to do a job. It’s clear that the school system doesn’t provide enough money. Schools must spend the funds properly to be able to educate the students at the level needed to meet the standards. I don’t think schools misspend money. They can’t afford to. The greatest needs are making sure that all schools have the technology to teach our children, maybe improving these system, upgrading them, using more video in classes. These are areas that can enhance the learning and teaching experience.

Sin taxes to fund our school is a good idea. It frees states to provide other needed services for cities and towns. Money from the legalization of marijuana could be used to fund programs that address the issues of substance use and abuse including cigarette smoking and vaping.

I would increase the salaries of teachers and build in incentives for them to earn a bonus. Remodel some of the schools, give them updated furnishings and equipment, and maybe some incentives for youth to learn. Teachers would feel that they are appreciated. A fresh look in school with furnishings and equipment always make you feel good and excited, and it could lead to a better and more stimulating learning environment.

Frederick, 71, Black grandfather and guardian for his grandson in urban Massachusetts

I do not think any school is adequately funded, especially when we have people at the top who want to take away money for things like war funding and unneeded border construction. With the funds they have, the schools are doing a decent job of supplying what the kids need, and thankfully we have a great bunch of parents who chip in where they can to help pick up the slack. I cannot think of anything where money (at least at our school) is being misspent.

Albert, 49, Asian father of two sons in suburban California

Most schools are not adequately funded. If they were they wouldn't have to constantly be asking us parents for fundraising money. I don't think any money that comes from gambling or marijuana should be used to fund the schools.

Cheryl, 53, White mother of seven in urban Washington

I'd like to see more money for salaries so better teachers could be recruited and would stay around longer. I would pay any amount of money to get rid of common core and standardized testing and let my district develop their own curriculum that is created by and for teachers, to benefit students and their academic growth.

Robin, 49, White mother of high school student in urban Pennsylvania

If I could produce unlimited funding for my son's public schools, I would raise the public school teachers salaries by 50%. That would give teachers incentive to stay and to work hard for our children. It would also be incentive to get new teachers here. Our classrooms would have all of the day-to-day supplies (paper, pencils, pens, etc.) they need, and no child or family would have to pay for school supplies out their own pockets. School meals, breakfast, and lunches would be nutritionally better, more appetizing, and free. No more families would have to worry about qualifying for free or reduced meals for their kids.

Sandy, 54, White mother of one in urban Missouri

Where we need more help in funding is #1 — teachers! They do so much for our kids and are underpaid and overworked. We need more funding for the school supplies that our kids use throughout the year.

Elizabeth, 36, White mother of two elementary school students in urban North Carolina​​

Pay the teachers more. That recruits better teachers. Teachers are the backbone of a good education.

Deanna, 42, Hispanic mother of two in rural Colorado​​​​

Education needs to be one of our top priorities and not just be a talking point during the campaign then forgotten or pushed aside for “pet” projects.

Albert, 49, Asian father of two sons in suburban California​​

Investing in our kids is one of the most profitable investments we can make.

Michael, 43, White father of three in suburban Texas​​

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